`53 H-D Panhead: Chopped and Awesome | Street Chopper

`53 H-D Panhead: Chopped and Awesome

Into the blue

panhead chopper

`53 H-D Panhead: Chopped and Awesome

The latest step in their creative evolution. Looks pretty damn good.

Photos: Tommy Koppingers

First and foremost, a custom chopper is a creative work. It's a look into how the maker thinks. Or, at least, what went through their gray matter when they thought up the bike.

Line up all the custom motorcycles they've ever built, from first to last, and you get a rolling road map of the builder's creative evolution. That first bike is usually much less polished than the most recent. This Panhead chopper is a perfect example of what I mean.

A few years back, Christopher Staab and Rudy Sedgewick met at the Smokeout West in Arizona. It was the start of a team effort that produced eight or nine ’60s-style choppers, the last of which sits before you on these very pages. Chris came up with the designs, and Rudy cut and welded them into reality. “He had some things he wanted to do,” Rudy says. “I threw in ideas along the way.”

Those first few choppers were Chris figuring out what he really wanted and how to get it. Trial and error was the name of the game, finding out what ideas did and didn't work well together. Over time, the two guys narrowed their focus down until Chris knew exactly what he hoped to build: a straight-legged home for his Panhead motor. Only, Chris didn't want to cut the frame to make it fit.

That was the real challenge here. Rudy told us: “This was the one where he sharpened what he wanted and was after. We couldn't have built this one if we hadn't built the others.” Compared to its older siblings, this chopper is a lot more put together and polished (execution-wise) than the rest. It took a while for Chris to find a frame that fit his bill, but in the end, he made it happen. The rest of the bike was made to work in and around that skeleton.

What really stands out about this chop is the sissy bar. It slides through the fender, and the top is removable while the bottom is stationary. That was pretty tricky. The guys created and used more than 20 pieces in the sissy bar alone!

harley panhead chopper

`53 H-D Panhead: Chopped and Awesome

Into the blue

Photos: Tommy Koppingers

harley panhead chopper

`53 H-D Panhead: Chopped and Awesome

Into the blue

Photos: Tommy Koppingers

harley panhead chopper

`53 H-D Panhead: Chopped and Awesome

Into the blue

Photos: Tommy Koppingers

harley panhead chopper

`53 H-D Panhead: Chopped and Awesome

Into the blue

Photos: Tommy Koppingers

harley panhead chopper

`53 H-D Panhead: Chopped and Awesome

Into the blue

Photos: Tommy Koppingers

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